A Seussical Tribute

“The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.”

How appropriate that this year UK World Book Day falls on the Birthday of the legendary Dr. Seuss!

drseuss300Theodor Seuss Geisel was born today March 2 in 1904 in Springfield, MA. The pen nameDr. Seuss was developed during his years at  Dartmouth College and the University of Oxford. His first jobs were mainly that of an illustrator, working for such companies as Time magazine, Vanity Fair, and Life. Our beloved Dr. Seuss  later became a famous American writer and illustrator; who we know as the author of famous children’s books such as The Cat in The Hat, Oh The Places You Will Go, and How The Grinch Stole Christmas.

Here are a few of my favorites:


Green Egg’s and Ham

“Try them, try them, and you may! Try them and you may, I say.”

 

 

One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish

“From there to here, from here to there, funny things are everywhere!”

 

 

Horton Hears a Who!

“A persons a person no matter how small.”

 

 

 

 

The list goes on, and on. I have honestly never read a book by Dr. Seuss
that I did not like, let alone love. drseuss-brand-hero-01

His brilliance and charm have always captured my heart, as well as many others (of all ages and backgrounds.) I believe his clever and inspiring words will continue to have a profound effect on the literary minds of children, the world of education, and serve as an inspiration to those needing to get back to the basics.

dr-seuss-hat-clip-art-yio9LoeiE
Fun Fact:
  During World War II, he worked in an animation department of the United States Army where he produced several short films, including Design for Death, which later won the 1947 Academy Award for Documentary Feature

 

Please share about your Dr. Seuss experiences, books you love,
quotes that inspire you, etc.

“Don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.”

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Book Towns: Part I

Cafe Book Bean

ruedeesperance
A Book Town is a trend that began in the 1960’s and refers to a town or village with a large number of used book or antiquarian book stores.
Along with their unique and plentiful bookstores they also host wonderful literary festivals

These book festivals attract book lovers and bibliophiles from all over the world. A number of towns are also members of the International Organisation of Book Towns.

Check out these first 6 awesome, yet quaint little book towns:

240-Montolieu-village-du-livre-Aude_focus_eventsMontolieu, France
Sometimes referred to as the “Village of Books.” Montolieu was the town that first introduced me to the concept of “Book Towns.” With a population of roughly only 747 people Montolieu contains fifteen bookshops, mostly specializing in second-hand and
16540322265_089531e1a8_zantiquarian books.
Every year the town offers many workshops such as: Used and antiquarian bookshops, Working craftspeople of books and art, The Arts and Crafts of the Book Museum, Bibliophilia…

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Profound Paragraphs X

Petrarch : The First Modern Scholar and Man of Letters

There is no lighter burden, nor more agreeable, than a pen. Other pleasures fail us or wound us while they charm, but the pen we take up rejoicing and lay down with satisfaction, for it has the power to advantage not only its lord and master, but many others as well, even though they be far away — sometimes, indeed, though they be not born for thousands of years to come.” 


Francesco Petrarca
:
Born today  July 20th 1304
An Italian scholar and poet in Renaissance Italy.
387px-Boccaccio_by_Morghen.jpgPetrarch’s rediscovery of Cicero’s letters is often credited for initiating the 14th-century Renaissance. In the 16th century, Pietro Bembo created the model for the modern Italian language based predominantly on Petrarch’s works.
He would be later endorsed as a model for Italian style by the Accademia della Crusca. Petrarch’s sonnets were admired and imitated throughout Europe during the Renaissance and became a model for lyrical poetry. He is also known for being the first to develop the concept of the “Dark Ages.” This standing back from
his time was possible because he straddled two worlds – the classical and
his own modern day. He died July 19, 1374 – one day short of his
seventieth birthday. (Wikipedia)

“Books have led some to learning and others to madness.”
~Petrach

And the fortunate are led to both! 🙂

 

 

Profound Paragraphs IX

Today is a 2-For. I have been listening to the audible version of The Fellowship of The Rings, and it has been an absolute delight. Listening to it gives a whole new perspective and feeling to the beautifully written words.

I am ever in awe of the brilliance of J.R.R Tolkien, and forever will be. 

“I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.
“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide.
All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

“Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them?
Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.
For even the very wise cannot see all ends.”

This audio rendition is absolutely amazing, the narrator is astounding.

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Both of these paragraphs are so wonderfully thought provoking and reflective. I love that Tolkien can take us into the fantasy realm
full of beauty and adventure, yet his words still
strike home in the most relevant ways.

What “Fellowship” quote resonates with you? If you can choose just one 😉