Brown Bag Book Exchange

16711971_1778298172489682_3883182582501892248_nThis is a brown bag book exchange. You bring a book and you get a book, but you do not reveal what you bring. The book you bring must be disguised and briefly described. So bring your book covered or in a brown paper bag, write the genre on the outside and/or a few tidbits about the book, but keep it a mystery!16649565_1778214235831409_8198701075672050166_n

Books should be in really good condition. Bring up to 2 (different) books. There will also be awesome coffee and pie available for purchase via the delicious Bipartisan Cafe. So come and join the fun, meet new people, and read a new bookdownload!download (1)

Advertisements

Evocative Literary Lines Women

“There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.”
― Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice

“Better to be strong than pretty and useless.”
― Lili St. Crow
61-icWG0flL._AC_UL320_SR216,320_
Strange Angels

“I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.”
― Charlotte Brontë

Jane Eyre

“Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.”
― Virginia Woolf

A Room of One’s Own

“A woman has to live her life, or live to repent not having lived it.”
― D.H. Lawrence

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

What woman/women in literature have inspired you?

Tribute to Browning’s Beauty

“The beautiful seems right by force of beauty…”

elizabeth_barrett_browning_2Elizabeth Barrett Browning

(6 March  1806 – 29 June 1861)
She was one of the most prominent English poets of the Victorian era, popular in Britain and the United States during her lifetime.

Elizabeth’s volume Poems (1844) brought her great success, attracting the admiration of the writer Robert Browning. Their correspondence, courtship and marriage were carried out in secret, for fear of her father’s disapproval. Following the wedding she was indeed disinherited by her father.
The couple moved to Italy in 1846, where she would live for the rest of her life. They had one son, Robert Barrett Browning, whom they called Pen. She died in Florence in 1861.A collection of her last poems was published by her husband shortly after her death.
Elizabeth’s work had a major influence on prominent writers of the day, including the American poets Edgar Allan Poe and Emily Dickinson. She is remembered for such poems as “How Do I Love Thee?” (Sonnet 43, 1845) and Aurora Leigh (1856).

“What is genius but the power of expressing a new individuality?”
~Elizabeth Barrett Browning

 

For the Love of Longfellow

“The love of learning, the sequestered nooks, And all the sweet serenity of books. “
hwlon
Born today in 1807:
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
(February 27 – March 24, 1882)
An American poet and educator whose works include “Paul Revere’s Ride”, The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy, and was one of the five Fireside Poets.

“Every man has his secret sorrows which the world knows not; and often times
we call a man cold when he is only sad.”

 

As the most widely known and best-loved American poet of his lifetime, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow achieved a level of national and international prominence previously unequaled in the literary history of the United States.

 

I adore Longfellow. I fell in love with his poignant yet beautiful poetry early on, and he has remained a favorite of mine. He has a way of mournfully telling you how wonderful life and love are, and someone it makes the meaning stick with a realness that is more lasting. A Psalm of Life was the first poem I ever committed to memory, every line enchanted me.

Afternoon in February

The day is ending,
The night is descending;
The marsh is frozen,
The river dead. 

Through clouds like ashes
The red sun flashes
On village windows
That glimmer red. 

The snow recommences;
The buried fences
Mark no longer
The road o'er the plain; 

While through the meadows,
Like fearful shadows,
Slowly passes
A funeral train. 

The bell is pealing,
And every feeling
Within me responds
To the dismal knell; 

Shadows are trailing,
My heart is bewailing
And tolling within
Like a funeral bell.

I end with a quote from my all time favorite:
“Let us, then, be up and doing, with a heart for any fate; still achieving,
still pursuing, learn to labor and to wait.”
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The Short List

An Abby Wright illustration of a women reading a book outside in the snowIt’s another iced-in day here in PDX, with a frozen landscape I dare not venture into. With all of these ice and snow days, I’ve had more time to read than usual. This got me thinking, short stories that are perfect for situations like this; You didn’t plan on having time to read, but now you do.

There are so many great short stories, but I thought I’d compile a go-to list of classics, that are universally great.

Here is my Short List:

 The Snow Queen
Hans Christian Anderson

Of course this wintry weather has me thinking of “The Snow Queen” but the whole HCA fairytale collection is a great thing to have on hand!

Rated 4.4 on amazon.com

 

 

Happy Prince & Other Stories
by Oscar Wilde

Includes stories that appeal to both child and adult with their themes of love, truth and sacrifice. The other stories are: The Selfish Giant, The Nightingale and the Rose, The Devoted Friend, and The Remarkable Rocket.

Rated 4.6 on amazon.com

 

The Magic Shop
H.G. Wells

Written in the year 1903, this book is one of the most popular novels of H. G. Wells, and has been translated into several other languages around the world. This book will take you back to the days when you believed in magic, maybe that’s still today.

Rated 4.3 on amazon.com

 

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow
by Washington Irving

The story is set in 1790 in the countryside around the Dutch settlement of Tarry Town (historical Tarrytown, New York), in a secluded glen called Sleepy Hollow. Sleepy Hollow is renowned for its ghosts and the haunting atmosphere that pervades the imaginations of its inhabitants and visitors

Rated 4.2 on amazon.com

Rip Van Winkle
by Washington Irving
Follow up Sleepy Hallow with the legendary enchantment of Rip Van Winkle in the Kaatskill Mountains; the gruesome end of Ichabod Crane, who met the headless horseman of Sleepy Hollow; the spectre bridegroom who turned out to be happily substantial; the pride of an English village and the come-uppance of the over-zealous Mountjoy – these witty, perceptive and captivating tales range from fantasy to romance.

Rated 4.3 on amazon.com

The Short Novels of
John Steinbeck

From the tale of commitment, loneliness and hope in Of Mice and Men, to the tough yet charming portrait of people on the margins of society in Cannery Row, to The Pearl’s examination of the fallacy of the American dream, Steinbeck stories of realism, that were imbued with energy and resilience.

Rated 4.5 on amazon.com

On the topic of Shorts, here is a mini drink that really packs a punch:

Book Bean: Café Bombón
bombon_miniA Cuban drink with roots to Valencia, Spain. 

Espresso served with sweetened condensed milk in a 1:1 ratio. Bombón means chocolate in Spanish. Sprinkle with cinnamon, nutmeg, or even cayenne for extra pop of flavor.

 

Grimm’s Complete Fairy Tales
The Brothers Grimm
They are the stories we’ve known since we were children. Rapunzel. Hansel and Gretel. Cinderella. Sleeping Beauty. But the works originally collected by the Brothers Grimm in the early 1800s are not necessarily the versions we heard before bedtime. They’re darker and often don’t end very happily—but they’re often far more interesting.

Rated 4.6 on amazon.com

 

Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Three Stories
Truman Capote
Holly Golightly knows that nothing bad can ever happen to you at Tiffany’s; her poignancy, wit, and naïveté continue to charm. This volume also includes three of Capote’s best-known stories, “House of Flowers,” “A Diamond Guitar,” and “A Christmas Memory,” which the Saturday Review called “one of the most moving stories in our language.”

Rated 4.4 on amazon.com

The Bazaar of Bad Dreams: Stories
Stephen King

He has dazzled an entire generation of readers with his genius as a prominent writer of short fiction. Now he once again assembles a generous array of unforgettable, tantalizing tales – including those that, until recently, have never been published in a book

Rated 4.3 on amazon.com



The Five People You Meet in Heaven
by Mitch Albom

This story follows the life and death of a maintenance man named Eddie. In a heroic attempt to save a little girl from being killed by an amusement park ride that is about to fall, Eddie is killed and sent to heaven, where he encounters five people who had a significant impact upon him while he was alive.

Rated 4.6 on amazon.com

The Tell-Tale Heart
by Edgar Allan Poe

A story first published in 1843.
It is told by an unnamed narrator who endeavors to convince the reader of his sanity, while describing a murder he committed.
Intrigued..? 😉

Rated 4.7 on amazon.com


To Build a Fire and Other Stories
by Jack London

If you need a good warming up after some of those chillers, here is a classic collection of some of Jack London’s most loved short stories. His writing is heart-warming and grounding, a great way to spend a few hours or days.

Rated 4.5 on amazon.com
images

What are some of your favorite short stories?