A Salute to C.S. Lewis

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Happy Birthday to the Brilliant and Truly Imaginative C.S. Lewis

43363176071_4c83157eea_b - CopyBorn on November 29, 1898, in Belfast, Ireland, C.S. Lewis went on to teach at Oxford University and became a renowned Christian apologist writer, using logic and philosophy to support the tenets of his faith. Lewis wrote more than 30 books, which have been translated into more than 30 languages and have sold millions of copies.
He is also known throughout the world as the author of The Chronicles of Narnia fantasy series, which have been adapted into various films for the big and small screens.

“True humility is not thinking less of yourself; it is thinking of yourself less.”

As one of my all time favorite Authors I would love to showcase
my three  favorite works:

The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe

The first (some say 2nd) book in C. S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia series, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe endures more than half a century after its publication. It is not necessarily my favorite of the series, that would be a hard thing to choose. However it is brilliant and holds within it, everything I love about the series as a whole.

Rated 4.7 on amazon.com

“Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.” 

Out of the Silent Planet
Written during the dark hours immediately before and during the Second World War, C. S. Lewis’s Space Trilogy, of which Out of the Silent Planet is the first volume, stands alongside such works as Albert Camus’s The Plague and George Orwell’s 1984 as a timely parable that has become timeless, beloved by succeeding generations as much for the sheer wonder of its storytelling as for the significance of the moral concerns. For the trilogy’s central figure, C. S. Lewis created perhaps the most memorable character of his career, the brilliant, clear-eyed, and fiercely brave philologist Dr. Elwin Ransom.

Rated 4.5 on amazon.com

“If we find ourselves with a desire that nothing in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that we were made for another world.”

The Screwtape Letters

Written in a satirical style. First published in February 1942, the story takes the form of a series of letters from a senior Demon Screwtype to his nephew Wormwood, a Junior Tempter. The uncle’s mentorship pertains to the nephew’s responsibility in securing the damnation of a British man known only as “the Patient”. This tale was both eerie and thought-provoking, a chilling combination, but one that will always stay with me.

Rated 4.3 on amazon.com

“You can never get a cup of tea large enough
or a book long enough to suit me.”

Fun Fact: Lewis was good friends with equally brilliant J. R. R. Tolkien and both members of the Literary group, The Inklings.

“We are what we believe we are.” ~C.S. LewisCSLewisPlaque

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The Spell Begins to Break

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“Didn’t I tell you,” answered Mr. Beaver, “that she’d made it always winter and never Christmas? Didn’t I tell you? Well, just come and see!”

 And then they were all at the top and did see.

2014-12-23-09-00-54.jpgIt was a sledge, and it was reindeer with bells on their harness. But they were far bigger than the Witch’s reindeer, and they were not white but brown. And on the sledge sat  a person whom everyone knew the moment they set eyes on him. He was a huge man in a bright red robe (bright as holly berries) with a hood that had fur inside it and a great white beard that fell like a foamy waterfall over his chest. Everyone knew him because, though you see people of his sort only in Narnia, you see pictures of them and hear them talked about even in our world-the world on this side of the wardrobe door. But when you really see them in Narnia it is rather different. Some of the pictures of Father Christmas in our world make him look only funny and jolly. But now that the children actually stood looking at him they didn’t find it quite like that. He was so big, and so glad, and so real, that they all became quite still. They felt very glad, but also solemn.
“I’ve come at last,” said he.
C.S. Lewis “The Chronicles of Narnia”