Yom HaShoah Tribute

Israel’s Holocaust and Heroism Remembrance Day April 23rd-24thHolocaustRemembrance1920x1080

“There may be times when we are powerless to prevent injustice, but there must never be a time when we fail to protest.”
~Elie Wiesel

On this day of commemoration here are a few relative books:

These are two wonderful gifts I receivedbooks

“The Holocaust Museum In Washington”
This book was written by Jeshajahu Weinberg, the founding director of the museum. There are hundreds of color and black-and-white photographs throughout the book–photos of kitchen utensils, hair, shoes, forged documents, artificial limbs, and luggage and prayer shawls confiscated from the victims.
Haunting and terrifying are photos showing charred corpses of concentration camp inmates, a starved prisoner in Buchenwald,
a young Jewish partisan woman being hanged in Minsk in 1941, Danish Jews escaping to Sweden on a small boat, and Hungarian Jews arriving in Auschwitz in 1944. The book provides a well-rounded history of  the Holocaust, but I would still really love to visit this museum in person!20160127_154808

“Once We Were Brothers”
a fictional novel by Ronald H. Balson (a Chicago attorney.) His travels to Warsaw and southern Poland in connection with a complex telecommunications case, inspired this book. It is a story about two boys and a family who struggle to survive in war-torn Poland. I have not read it yet, but I have a feeling I will really enjoy it!

Rated 4.6 on amazon.com

Here are a couple books on my wishlist and tbr list:

(click pictures and titles for more info.)

From A Name to A Number:

A Holocaust Survivor’s Autobiography
A deeply personal story about one man’s lovely childhood that turned into a nightmare at the age of 15. He survives 5 camps and a multitude of atrocities. He is one of few survivors, and resides in my hometown of Portland, OR. I plan to read this book soon, I am fascinated by the prospect of it. 

Rated 4.9 on amazon.comb607651846980f4a6cbd7999a2e38ee3


Book Bean:
Jewish Traditional Apple Tea
In a saucepan, bring a cup of water and allspice (4whole) just to a boil; add 2 black-tea bags. Remove from the heat; cover and steep for 3 minutes. Discard allspice and tea bags. Stir in a cup of apple juice and honey to taste.


The Boy on the Wooden Box:
How the Impossible Became Possible . . . on Schindler’s List
This, the only memoir published by a former Schindler’s list child, perfectly captures the innocence of a small boy who goes through the unthinkable. My watching the movie Schindler’s list is one of a series of events that sparked my intrigue and constant curiosity about the Holocaust. I am looking forward to this book.

Rated 4.8 on amazon.com

turk-kahvesiBook Bean: Turkish coffee
A method of preparing coffee using finely powdered roast coffee beans and roasting them in a small pot. Add in a little Cardamon spice for a nice aroma and taste. It is also known as “Jewish coffee” or “Israeli Turkish coffee” or “Arabic coffee”

Fun Fact: It’s a tradition in Israel to bring coffee to a friend’s house for Shabbat or send coffee in a gift basket for a birthday. Coffee is also an excellent addition to a Mishloach Manot basket for the Jewish holiday of Purim.

“The world is a dangerous place, not because of those who do evil, but because of those who look on and do nothing.” Albert Einstein

What related book have you read, that really moved/impact you?

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Livros e de Café do Rio

Christ the Redeemer, a granite monolith with cable cars to its summit,rio-de-janeiro-combo-tour-santa-teresa-corcovado-mountain-and-santa-in-rio-de-janeiro-152482 sprawling favelas, gorgeous beaches, samba, and of course the joyous Carnival! Rio is known for all of these things, but there is much more to be seen…
With today’s kick-off of the 2016 Rio Olympics, I decide to share my Book Bean inspired Rio De Janeiro Favorites.

Here is a collection of book affiliates and cafes of beautiful Rio De Janeiro:

Livraria Cultura
livraria_cultura_004
A comprehensive shop filled with knowledge and fun. The inviting atmosphere of this theater turned bookstore is full of the color and culture famous to Rio de Janeiro.

 

Cafecito 
cafecito-anna-fasano-santa-teresa
This artsy spot serves breakfast
& gourmet fare, with a patio
& views of historic surroundings. Perfectly positioned on a picturesque balcony overlooking Santa Teresa’s busiest street for drinking and dining.

 

Paulo-Coelho - Edited.jpgPaulo Coelho
A Brazilian lyricist and novelist. He is the recipient of numerous international awards, of which include the Crystal Award by the World Economic Forum. He has sold over 200 million copies worldwide and is the all-time bestselling Portuguese language author.

 

 

Two of Coelho’s
most popular Books
(click either picture for details)

 

Next up is a place on my travel bucket list; this library is Exquisite!

Real Gabinete Português de Leitura
02.jpgA group of far-from-home Portuguese immigrants banded together to create a Portuguese library in 1837, although construction on the Real Gabinete Português de Leitura didn’t get going until 1880. The neo-Manueline building’s limestone façade showcases Portuguese explorers like Prince Henry the Navigator, Vasco da Gama, and Pedro Álvares Cabral in sculpture.
03.jpgThe cathedral-like reading room has a stained-glass dome and wooden galleries. Its ornate bookshelves hold the largest collection of Portuguese literature outside of the motherland. (wikipdia)


CONFEITARIA COLOMBO

6_confeitaria-colombo
Founded in 1894 The Confeitaria Colombo in Rio de Janeiro is a beautiful historic French café with upscale décor, stained-glass windows, mirrors, gourmet chocolate & tea.

Now I just need my ticket to Rio! Whose with me? 🙂

Book Towns: Part I

ruedeesperance
A Book Town is a trend that began in the 1960’s and refers to a town or village with a large number of used book or antiquarian book stores.
Along with their unique and plentiful bookstores they also host wonderful literary festivals

These book festivals attract book lovers and bibliophiles from all over the world. A number of towns are also members of the International Organisation of Book Towns.

Check out these first 6 awesome, yet quaint little book towns:

240-Montolieu-village-du-livre-Aude_focus_eventsMontolieu, France
Sometimes referred to as the “Village of Books.” Montolieu was the town that first introduced me to the concept of “Book Towns.” With a population of roughly only 747 people Montolieu contains fifteen bookshops, mostly specializing in second-hand and
16540322265_089531e1a8_zantiquarian books.
Every year the town offers many workshops such as: Used and antiquarian bookshops, Working craftspeople of books and art, The Arts and Crafts of the Book Museum, Bibliophilia stocks, Educational activities around the Book and its craft, and many more. These workshops attract approx. . 52 000 visitors each year.

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Hay-on-Wye
, Wales
The concept of book towns first came into being in the 1960s, when the fortunes of Hay-on-Wye, a small market town on the Welsh/English border, were transformed by the power of books. The opportunity to regenerate struggling villages and towns by opening up secondhand bookstores and welcoming literary events has since been embraced by many other locations around the world. The town of just under 2,000 also hosts an “honesty bookshop,” where you make your selection against a backdrop of some old ruins and leave your money in a box.

jimbocho1-300x270Jinbōchō, Tokyo
Known as Tokyo’s center of used-book stores and publishing houses, and as a popular antique and curio shopping area. In 1913, a large fire destroyed most of the area. In the wake of the fire, a university professor named Shigeo Iwanami opened a 10606993035_281805d4f6bookstore in Jinbōchō which eventually grew into today’s Iwanami Shoten publishing house. Over time, the area became popular with university students and intellectuals, and many small bookstores and cafes opened there.

4959307_orig
Hobart
, New York
Hobart is a historical village in Delaware County, New York, United States. This beautiful agricultural community has a population of approx. 441 (at the 2010 census.) The village has 5 bookstores, as well as 20 other book sellers within a 20 mile radius. In 1999 the town was a ghost town but by 2005 Don Dales (a local entrepreneur) and musician saved the town by establishing the first book town east of the Mississippi.
For a detailed story about this town’s amazing
329261_origjourney check out the article in this link:

 


800px-Urueña_vista2_louUrueña
, Spain
In the medieval town of Urueña, in Valladolid, you will find the first “Villa del Libro” in Spain. In the streets of this town you will find 12 bookshops selling old or out of print books, or wher e interesting activities take place: El Rincón Escrito, Alejandría Bookshop, “Wine Museum” Cellar Bookshop (specialising in science and fiction literature about wine), Alcuino Caligrafía (organises
26703331courses on calligraphy of other cultures, for all levels), El 7 Bookshop (specialising in the world of bullfighting), Samuel Bookshop, Alvacal, Boutique del Cuento, Almadí Bookshop, La Punta del Iceberg, Alcaraván Bookshop and the Artisan Book Binding Workshop of Urueña.
CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=167995

redu1Redu, Belgium
In the beautiful Ardennes region of Belgium, Redu is a lovely little village with a population of 500. Local villager Noel Anselot returned from a trip to Hay-on-Wye In 1979, and was so inspired that he decided to regenerate his own tiny village by attracting booksellers. He wrote to many book-dealers across the region, inviting them to set up shop in some of the original village buildings (such as barns, houses, and sheds) to keep the look of the village intact. The project was a success. Now 17 4584770426_5ef869f57fbookshops specializing in secondhand books and comics are based in the village. Redu holds a number of book-related exhibitions and events every year, including a book night when the bookshops stay open all night long. The town was officially declared a book town in 1984 after holding its first book festival.

I cannot get over how beautiful these towns are.
It would be a dream to visit any one of them. However, I think I need to save up so I can plan an around the book world in 80 days trip!

Have you been to any of these book towns? Which would you love to visit?

Stay tuned for Part II tomorrow evening! Now Available: Pt: II

Top International Cafés

coffee-house-largeI have shared with you the noteworthy coffee shops at the top of my list in the U.S.: Top U.S. Coffee Houses and now I will share those I found all over the world. Although there are far more than I could possible include, I hope justice is done.


Here are my Top picks for Noteworthy Cafés internationally:

Cielito Querido Café (Mexico City, Mexico)

A unique place rich with the warmth and flavor of Latin history.
Full of color and aroma to tempt the senses.  

Coffee Collective (Copenhagen, Denmark)

The Coffee Collective is a micro roastery that drives to provide their customers with an exceptional coffee experience and to give better living conditions to coffee farmers.

Rosetta Roastery (Cape Town, South Africa)

Another South African jewel passionate about coffees that are unique and full of character, as much so as the people that are drawn to drink them.

Kaffeine (London, England)

Contemporary cafe with coffee tasting and brewing classes, turning out cakes, sandwiches and soups. The owner Colin Harmon is a 4-time
Irish Barista Champion, and has worked hard to establish his
world renown coffee bar.

Addison & Steele (Perth, Australia)

The name honors two 18th century Oxford scholars who brought together like-minded intellectuals in London’s first coffee shops to debate the revolutionary ideas of the Enlightenment. This bright and airy space on the corner of Fitzgerald and Wasley Streets in North Perth is sleek and inviting. There is plenty of space for eager caffeine addicts  

Mind the Cup (Athens, Greece)

Run by a World Barista Champion their motto focuses on moving forward steadily, concentrating on what you do, and always trying
to improve. It has served them well in establishing this charming
award-winning coffee house.

Kronotrop (Istanbul, Turkey)

Kronotrop is the first micro-roaster in Istanbul, with beans imported from all around the world, and branches in Cihangir, Maslak, and Sultanahmet. It is widely regarded as one of the first specialty coffee bar and roastery in all of Turkey.

Snickarbacken 7 ( Stockholm, Sweden)

Chic and spacious Snickerbacken 7 is located in the heart of Stockholm, in a building from the late 1800’s that used to be stables. Tucked away in a beautiful building with high ceilings and vintage charm this concept shop is also an art gallery.

L’oisiveThé (Paris, France)

Thé et Tricot. Paris’ original knit café owned by Aimée in Paris, France. This darling little café doubles as a knitting haven. The functionality of this adorable shop gives it a quaint pairing of beauty and comfort.

The Coffee Academics (Hong Kong, China)

The Coffee Academïcs Studio features professional espresso equipment and myriads of coffee accessories. With a commercial bar and a loft-like interior, they boast the most stylish coffee training centre in Hong Kong. With unique offerings such as lattes sweetened with organic raw agave nectar and spiced with ground black pepper.

All of these Cafés have there own persona unique touch and passion, and I have been happy to learn about them. I am sure their are many other worthy candidates, and I hope to discover them. 

“I remember that – you know, I didn’t receive a formal education. I was educated in the Montevideo cafe, in the cafes of Montevideo. There, I received my first lessons in the art of telling stories, storytelling.” ~ Eduardo Galeano

Tell me about your favorite café, what makes them special?