Wake-Up Wednesday: PB&Joe

What could be a better pick-me-up than a drink twist reminiscent of a favorite childhood snack!

IMG_6276Book Bean: PB & Joe
This can be made with Brewed Coffee or Espresso as a base. Start with 1 scoop of vanilla bean ice-cream in a blender, add 2Tsp-1Tbsp of creamy peanut butter (to taste) last add very hot coffee or espresso, blend well until smooth. Pour into 1 large mug or 2 small mugs to share. Add steamed/frothed milk or hot cream to taste. Sprinkle with cocoa powder. (To make this drink cold just add PB to coffee and let cool before adding to blender, then use cold milk or cream.)

The perfect Book to pair with this bold and snacky drink, is something short and sweet/savory! 

My pick: “The Phantom Tollbooth” By Norton Juster 
Illustrated by Jules Feiffer

A book that speaks universally to both children and adults. A story that like the old PB&J is a classic, full of both warmth and goodness.

Go on an adventure with Milo, as he discovers The Island of Conclusions (you get there by jumping) and rescues Rhyme and Reason. You will discover like Milo does, that life is far from dull, but more interesting and exciting than you’ve ever imagined.
Rated 4.8 on amazon.com

A wee sample to wet your appetite:

You know you're in good hands when, in the midst of some 
nutty, didactic dialogue, the author disarms you.

"I guess I just wasn't thinking," said Milo.
"PRECISELY," shouted the dog as his alarm went off 
again. "Now you know what you mus do."
"I'm afraid I don't," admitted Milo, feeling quite stupid.
"Well," continued the watchdog impatiently, "since you 
got here by not thinking, it seems reasonable to expect that 
in order to get out, you must start thinking." And with that he 
hopped into the car.
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Friday the 13th Feature

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TGIF everyone, since this Friday is Friday the 13th I have decide to feature another Blogger. One who is exceptionally skilled at the eerie, spooky, and less than savory.
MJ Gale has so many exceptional pieces,
I urge you, especially those that like a good thrill to check out ThePhantomRem!


The Road Untraveled
Standing in the middle of the dirt roadway, frozen solid.
The air had gotten considerably colder…

Click here to read this and many other fantastic little tales!


Accolades for Arthur Conan Doyle

“How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?”

6815345113_e3ee5dc18e_bConan Doyle is most famous as the inventor of Sherlock Holmes, but he had a varied career as a writer, journalist and public figure.
Born Today on May 22nd 1859 in Edinburgh into a prosperous Irish family. He trained as a doctor, gaining his degree from Edinburgh University in 1881. He worked as a surgeon on a whaling boat and also as a medical officer on a steamer travelling between Liverpool and West Africa. He then settled in Portsmouth on the English south coast and divided his time between medicine and writing.

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
The most recognized detective in all of literature, Sherlock Holmes emerged on the crime scene in A Study in Scarlet in 1887. His deductive reasoning, keen insight, skillful observations, and investigative tactics became the tools necessary to solve riveting and intriguing crimes that continue to delight generations of readers. Discover or rediscover the joys of these fascinating mysteries.

Rated 4.5 on amazon.com

Vampire Stories
Who would suspect that the same mind that created the most famous literary detective of all time also took on the eternally popular genre of vampires? Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, a contemporary of Bram Stoker, gave us some fascinating works of vampire fiction. From the bloodsucking plant in “The American’s Tale” to the bloodsucking wife in “The Adventure of the Sussex Vampire,” he reveled in the horror created by creatures who survived on the blood of men and women.

Rated 4.1 on amazon.com
The Lost World
Talented and extremely ambitious reporter Edward Malone received a humiliating refusal from a beloved girl to marry him only on the grounds that he is too mediocre. The offended young man rushes to the editorial office and begs the authorities to send him to the most dangerous corner of the Earth, so that he can make a report there.

An experienced editor gives the young man a difficult task: at any cost to get an interview with the scandalously dangerous, impulsive Professor Challenger, glorious for his hatred of journalists. After a small but very colorful fight, the professor invites the young man to a conference where Challenger will make a statement that will shock the whole scientific world. It says that dinosaurs and other relic living creatures have been preserved on the inaccessible South American plateau. To support this statement the professor assembles an expedition in which the reporter Malone will become a representative of the press.
Rated 4.5 on amazon.com

“It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.”

What are you favorite Doyle delights, please share!

Remembering Browning

“Love, hope, fear, faith – these make humanity;
These are its sign and note and character.”

collection_5295_RobertBrowningRobert Browning was born in Camberwell on May 7th 1812 and educated by private tutors. His parents were wealthy enough to allow him to travel and to be a poet as if it were a profession. He came known by literary figures such s Wordsworth and Landor after the publication of “Paracelsus” in 1835, but he was unrecognized by the public until “Men an Women” appeared twenty years later. He was therefore almost unknown when in 1846 he eloped with Elizabeth Barrett.

He is now widely recognized as a master of dramatic monologue and psychological portraiture. Browning is perhaps best-known for a poem he didn’t value highly, The Pied Piper of Hamelin, a children’s poem that is quite different from his other work. He is also known for his long form blank poem The Ring and the Book, the story of a Roman murder trial in 12 books.

A long dramatic narrative poem, and, more specifically, a verse novel, of 21,000 lines. It was published in four volumes from 1868 to 1869 by Smith, Elder & Co.

The book tells the story of a murder trial in Rome in 1698, where an impoverished nobleman, Count Guido Franceschini, is found guilty of the murders of his wife Pompilia Comparini and her parents, having suspected his wife was having an affair with a young cleric.

“No, when the fight begins within himself, A man’s worth something.”

“One who never turned his back but marched breast forward, never doubted clouds would break, Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would triumph, Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better, sleep to wake.”


The love affair between two of the Victorian era’s most famous poets is one of passion, tragedy, illness, and ultimately, endurance. Collected here are their 573 love letters, which capture their courtship, their blossoming love, and their forbidden marriage.


Grow old with me! The best is yet to be.

 

One Book To Rule Them All

shutterstock_253710055-largeIn a poll I posted to help us all get to know each other I asked the question:
If you could only ever read one book forever, what book would you choose?

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Now many of you did say you’d rather not live, and though I’m sure many others felt torn between that option and having to chose, they did choose. Thanks to my fellow blogger friend Aurora who reminded me to share these wonderful choices with all of you, I have compiled the following montage.


There can only be one, one book to rule them all!

Part One of Three:


The number one answer given un-specifically to edition 8 times (12 total)

The Bible

This version is the most read and highly reviewed.

 

 The longest compilation of short storiesNow that was very hard to find out… So instead I just picked 10 famous short story authors and then found the one with the longest compilation, and the winner was…

Earnest Hemingway: The Complete Short Stories


Anything by Philip Roth

Well that leaves it pretty open, so here is one of Philip Roths most well read and a best reviewed books.

Nemisis


A Larousse Dictionary

Smart choice 🙂 but didn’t specify which, as it turns out Spanish is the most popular one. Great way to learn a new language, or get smarter at your own.


Swan Song 

by Robert R. Mc Cammon

This book is one of five that got 2 or more votes, looks like I may need to read it 🙂


The Game of Life and How to Play it

by  Florence Scovel Shinn

Another smart choice.


Absalom Absalom

by William Faulkner

I’ve been wanting to read this book

 

$_58

 

The General – William Booth

I had to guess at this one a little but I found this book:

The Authoritative Life of General William Booth

 

Ship of Brides

by JoJo Moyes

 

 

The Lion The Witch and The Wardrobe

by C.S. Lewis

I would go for the complete Chronicles of Narnia set (I think that counts)

 

The Biggest fattest book I can get my hands on:
The World Record for longest novel is
“À la recherche du temps perdu” 3036 pages, but that’s in french, but it was not published in one volume so it wouldn’t technically count for this person choice. However this book was chosen in the poll say yay for Proust!

“Zettels Traum” is the longest recorded book every published in one edition 1536 pages… but it’s German so I gotta pick an English one as well.

“Sir Charles Grandison” 1647 The longest English one volume book.

 


The Many Adventures of Winnie The Pooh:
Tales & Poems

by A. A. Milne

A charming choice!

Don Quixote

by Miguel de Cervantes

One of five to get multiple votes.

 


Bellydance for Beginners

This is the all I could find, or the closest…

 

I’d continue to write my own books, so that I’d always have something new


War and Peace

by Leo Tolstoy

A great choice, a good way to insure I’d get through it 🙂

 

4473

A Prayer For Owen Meany

by John Irving

After reading about this book I am very interested in reading it myself 🙂

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*
Letters to a Young Poet

by  Rainer Maria Rilke

 

*
*
Deadly Messengers

by Susan May

 


The Art of Happiness

by Dalai Lama

Very wise choice, but I think Pharrell would be infinitely stuck in my head 😀

 

The Lord of The Rings

by J.R.R. Tolkien

This book got 3 votes, one of only 5 to get multiple votes.

I can certainly attest to why, these are phenomenal books!

I just LOVE all the variety!

Some make sense, some are strange, some are very intriguing…
What do you think of these choices?
Find out more tomorrow in Pt. 2

What would you choose?