H.P. Lovecraft

Howard Phillips Lovecraft  – born today, August 20, 1890

He wrote many essays and poems early in his career, lovecraft_0.jpgbut gradually focused on the writing of horror stories. After the advent in 1923 of the pulp magazine Weird Tales, he contributed most of his fiction therein.
His relatively small corpus of fiction; three short novels and about sixty short stories, has nevertheless exercised a wide influence on subsequent work in the field. Though virtually unknown before his death, he is now regarded as one of the most significant 20th-century authors in his genre.

“The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear. And the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.”

Forbidden, dark, esoterically veiled knowledge is a central theme in many of Lovecraft’s works. Many of his characters are driven by curiosity or scientific endeavor, and in many of his stories the knowledge they uncover proves Promethean in nature, either filling the seeker with regret for what they have learned, destroying them psychically, or completely destroying the person who holds the knowledge.

The Complete Fiction of H.P. Lovecraft
collects the author’s novel, four novellas, and fifty-three short stories. Written between the years 1917 and 1935, this collection features Lovecraft’s trademark fantastical creatures and
supernatural thrills, as well as many horrific and cautionary science-fiction themes, 
that have influenced some of today’s writers and filmmakers, including Stephen King, Alan Moore, F. Paul Wilson, Guillermo del Toro, and Neil Gaiman.


“I think it is beyond doubt that H. P. Lovecraft has yet to be surpassed as the twentieth century’s greatest practitioner of the classic horror tale.”
 -Stephen King  The Call of Ctulhu

“I couldn’t live a week without a private library – indeed, I’d part with
all my furniture and squat and sleep on the floor before I’d let go of the 1500
or so books I possess.” ~H.P. Lovecraft

A man after my own heart!
Who can relate?

Advertisements

Mid-week Meet n’ Greet

B-U4uK5IUAAfcQB

Lets get to know each other:

Share about your love of books
and/or coffee/tea!

Source: Cafe Meet n’ Greet


Fictional Genres
662-bookshelves-wrhsonline-net

What are your Favorite Fiction Genres?

Saga Saturday IV

Rebecca

Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier

“Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.”

The unnamed narrator, a naïve young woman in her early 20s, becomes acquainted with a wealthy Englishman, Maximilian (Maxim) de Winter, a widower aged 42. After a fortnight of courtship, she agrees to marry him and, after the wedding and honeymoon, accompanies him to his mansion in Cornwall, the beautiful West Country estate Manderley.

The second Mrs. Maxim de Winter recalls the chilling events that transpired as she started a new life as the young bride of a husband she barely knew. In every corner and room of the isolated gray stone mansion were phantoms of a time dead but not forgotten.
An eerie past devotedly preserved by the sinister housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers: a suite immaculate and untouched, clothing laid out and ready to be worn, but not by any of the great house’s current occupants.
Sinyard_Rebecca_Danvers-e1361723009755A ghostly aura silhouettes her heart, as the second Mrs. de Winter walks in the shadow of her mysterious predecessor. She lives cautiously, yet compelled to uncover the darkest secrets and shattering truths about Maxim’s first wife; the late and hauntingly beautiful Rebecca.

Rated 4.4 on amazon.com

And the ashes blew towards us with the salt wind from the sea”

Earl-grey-tea-latte-web-2 - Edited
Book Bean:
Pale Moon
Earl grey tea steeped dense or pulled, white chocolate swirl, steamed/frothed milk, sprinkled with nutmeg.

 

Have you read Rebecca, or any other such hauntingly mysterious books?

WISO: “Midnight in The Garden…”

It’s the middle of the week again, and another blustery day in the N.W. The perfect Winds~day for my next ‘What I’m Sipping On.’ The title of this book alone is enough to make you want to read it.

I am reading “Midnight in The Garden of Good and Evil
(Click picture &/or title for more info.)

So far this book is extremely interesting and intriguing. It takes place in quaint little southern city of Savannah. A place thick with the feeling and personalities of the old south. I was a bit worried that it would not hold my interest, considering I saw the movie first, but it has yet to be a problem. Not only is the set up for the story line much different then the movie, but there are enough little extra quirks in the book to keep you angling for more.
It’s definitely an oddball book, one where you don’t quite know what is happening or where the books is going, but that is part of what makes it good. The most interesting thing about this reading experience, is that about 1/3 of the way through it, I discovered that it is a non-fiction book. Not only was I surprised due to the overall subtle-ness of the fact, but also because the story is so bizarre! John Berendt shows himself to be quite an impressive writer by this little fact alone.
I am only about half way through, but I am really enjoying the book. I love the quirky off the wall quality that it has. I like how easy going it is to read. I find myself interested enough that I look forward to reading it, but I don’t have this craze all the time to finish it. It’s just pleasant to pick up and read a chapter here and there. I can see why it is so revered, I just hope the second half doesn’t disappoint.

Have any of you read this book, or seen
the movie, or both?

What were your thoughts? (no spoilers please!)
I  will of course update this post when I’ve finished it. 🙂