Evocative Literary Lines VI

Today is the birthday of the great playwright George Bernard Shaw

akg895105Known at his insistence simply as
Bernard Shaw. Born July 26th 1856
an Irish playwright whose influence on Western theater, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, with a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory.
Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation, and in 1925 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

“You don’t get tired of muffins. But you don’t find inspiration in them”

Man and Superman

“I can’t turn your soul on. Leave me those feelings; and you can take away the voice and the face. They are not you.”

Pygmalion

Fun Fact: Pygmalion was the play that was later adapted to the famous musical “My Fair Lady.”

“You see things; you say, ‘Why?’ But I dream things that never were;
and I say ‘Why not?”

~Bernard Shaw

Tributea: Garth Nix

garthBorn today July 19th 1963 Garth Nix is an Australian writer who specializes in children’s and young adult fantasy novels. A full-time writer since 2001, more than five million copies of his books have been sold around the world and his work has been translated into 40 languages. Garth’s books have appeared on the bestseller lists of The New York Times, Publishers Weekly (US), The Bookseller(UK), The Australian and The Sunday Times (UK).


I personally fell in love with the Abhorsen trilogy, I found them refreshingly, original, and engrossing
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(Click any picture for links to the books amazon page.)


These two books were continuations off the original Abhorsen Trilogy. Although Clariel is listed as being book 4… Neither is as good as the original 3 but they are still good fixes for anyone who is a Abhorsen fan. 

 

A 5th book will be released on October 4th 2014

Have you read anything by Garth Nix? What did you love?

Profound Paragraphs IX

Today is a 2-For. I have been listening to the audible version of The Fellowship of The Rings, and it has been an absolute delight. Listening to it gives a whole new perspective and feeling to the beautifully written words.

I am ever in awe of the brilliance of J.R.R Tolkien, and forever will be. 

“I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.
“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide.
All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.”

“Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them?
Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.
For even the very wise cannot see all ends.”

This audio rendition is absolutely amazing, the narrator is astounding.

J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Both of these paragraphs are so wonderfully thought provoking and reflective. I love that Tolkien can take us into the fantasy realm
full of beauty and adventure, yet his words still
strike home in the most relevant ways.

What “Fellowship” quote resonates with you? If you can choose just one 😉

Evocative Literary Lines V

Keeping with the theme of the last few post, these lines are taken from the books of a few great American writers. Also, a bit of a self discovery/affirmation theme. 🙂

“She is a friend of my mind. She gather me, man. The pieces I am, she gather them and give them back to me in all the right order.”

Toni Morrison, Beloved

“I celebrate myself, and sing myself.”

Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

“And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good.”

John Steinbeck, East of Eden 

Beach Books

beach_books2.jpgI have been at the beach recently and so I’ve had more time to read than usual. I find myself thinking of books, beach books to be specific; novels filled with the lore and adventure of the sea. So, as has become my new habit, I have compiled a list of all the books that came to mind as I pondered the ocean’s beauty.
I have come up with a list of great books that capture the ocean’s beauty, strength, and wonder.

Here is my list of oceanic beauties, shore to decorate many beach bags:

The Old Man and The Sea

Ernest Hemingway

The endearing story of an old Cuban fisherman and his supreme ordeal: a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream. Using the simple, powerful language of a fable, Hemingway tells the timeless tale of courage in the face of defeat and personal triumph.

Rated 4.3 on amazon.com

 

The Little Mermaid

Hans Christian Anderson

After saving a prince from drowning, a mermaid princess embraces a life of extreme self-sacrifice to win his love and gain an immortal soul.

Over a century after its first publication, this tale persists as one of the world’s most enduring works of fantasy for children.

Rated 4.6 on amazon.com

 

The Light Between Oceans
M.L Stedman
Australian Tom Sherbourne returns home after fighting in the western trenches of World War I in Europe. He and his wife, Isabel, move to an isolated lighthouse, where they remain for several years. While there they informally adopt a baby girl who washes up in a lifeboat. When the child is two years old, Tom & Isabel return to the mainland on leave. There they discover that “there are other people in the world”, and keeping the child “has devastated one of them.”

Rated 4.4 on amazon.com

The Swiss Family Robinson

Johann David Wyss

Following a wild and raging storm, the Swiss family Robinson are stranded at sea. But the thundering waves have swept them off to a tropical island, where a new life awaits them. Their ship is laden with supplies and the island is packed with treasures, so they soon adapt and discover new dangers and delights every day.

Rated 4.1 on amazon.com

 

Life of Pi
Yann Martel
Life of Pi, according to Yann Martel, can be summarized in three statements: “Life is a story… You can choose your story… A story with God is the better story.” A recurring theme throughout the novel seems to be believability. Pi at the end of the book asks the two investigators “If you stumble at mere believability, what are you living for?” According to Gordon Houser there are two main themes of the book: “that all life is interdependent, and that we live and breathe via belief.”

Rated 4.3 on amazon.com

 Gift From The Sea
Anne Morrow Lindbergh
Casting an unsentimental eye on the trappings of modernity that threaten to overwhelm us: the time-saving gadgets that complicate rather than simplify, the multiple commitments that take us from our families. And by lyrically recording her thoughts during a brief escape from everyday demands, Lindbergh helps readers find a space for contemplation and creativity within their own lives.

Rated 4.6 on amazon.com

 

The Whale Rider
Witi Ihimaera
Eight-year-old Kahu craves her great-grandfather’s love and attention. But he is focused on his duties as chief of a Maori tribe in Whangara, on the East Coast of New Zealand; a tribe that claims descent from the legendary ‘whale rider’. Every generation since the whale rider, a male has inherited the title of chief, but now there is no male heir, only Kahu. She should be the next in line for the title, but her great-grandfather is blinded by tradition and sees no use for a girl. Kahu will not be ignored and leads her tribe to a bold new future.

Rated 4.3 on amazon.com

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea

Jules Verne

A classic science fiction novel by French writer Jules Verne published in 1870. It tells the story of Captain Nemo and his submarine Nautilus, as seen from the perspective of Professor Pierre Aronnax after he, his servant Conseil, and Canadian whaler Ned Land wash up on their ship. On the Nautilus, the three embark on a journey which has them going all around the world, under the sea.

Rated 4.3 on amazon.com

English Passengers
Matthew Kneale
In 1857 when Captain Illiam Quillian Kewley and his band of rum smugglers from the Isle of Man have most of their contraband confiscated by British Customs, they are forced to put their ship up for charter. The only takers are two eccentric Englishmen who want to embark for the other side of the globe. The Reverend Geoffrey Wilson believes the Garden of Eden was on the island of Tasmania. His traveling partner, Dr. Thomas Potter, unbeknownst to Wilson, is developing a sinister thesis about the races of men.

Rated 4.4 on amazon.com

Robinson Crusoe

Daniel Defoe

A castaway who spends years on a remote tropical island near Trinidad, encountering cannibals, captives, and mutineers before being rescued. The story is widely perceived to have been influenced by the life of Alexander Selkirk, a Scottish castaway who lived for four years on the Pacific island called “Más a Tierra”

Rated 4.2 on amazon.com


Jacob Have I Loved

Katherine Paterson

Sarah Louise, who lives with her family on a Chesapeake Bay island, grows up feeling less important than her beautiful twin sister. For once in her life, Louise wants to be the special one, but she must begin to find her own identity.

Rated 4.1 on amazon.com

 

 

In The Heart of The Sea

Nathaniel Philbrick

This novel brings to life the extraordinary ordeal of ordinary men, in the incredible story of the wreck of the whaleship Essex. An event as mythic in its own century as the Titanic disaster in ours, and the inspiration for the climax of Moby-Dick. A wealth of whale lore and a brilliantly detailed portrait of the lost, unique community of Nantucket whalers. In a harrowing page-turner, Philbrick restores this epic story to its rightful place in American history.

Rated 4.6 on amazon.com

What sea-worthy book/s do you consider a beach bag must?

Mid-week Meet n’ Greet

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Lets get to know each other:

Share about your love of books
and/or coffee/tea!

Source: Cafe Meet n’ Greet

Who’s your favorite American novelist and
what novel do you consider their greatest?